My collection of HP calculators

<Notes> from July 2015:
  1. Recovered using way back machine (again!)
  2. Used to be at http://home2.swipnet.se/~w-21015/mycollec.html
  3. This is how web pages looked in 1996
  4. The collection has grown since
  5. The picture was taken with an Epson PhotoPC with a whooping VGA-resolution (i.e. 0.3 MPixel) see EXIF data
  6. The hit counter has stopped working, but it was working around 2000
  7. Search engine Alta Vista not replaced with Google
</Notes>



hp35 hp80 hp80 hp45 hp65 hp67 hp97 hp75 hp25 hp41 hp48 hp12 hp33 hp29 hp71 h100 hp16 hp28 hp15
Clickable image


There is some new stuff here new stuff, and some links here 

The collection

On this picture you can see a range of HP calculators made from 1972 through 1993. I'm pretty proud of having the heavy classics, HP-35, -80, -45, -65, -67, and -97. I still would like to get a working -55.

Among the recent additions there is an HP-75 with HP-IL peripherals. The peripherals include a tape drive and a thermal printer. All units are of course battery powered.

The above picture is not complete, one or two units are missing, and I'm not sure whether I should put the HP LX series among the calculators. It's more of a PC, and besides that it's my everyday tool for keeping track of my daily schedule.

Each of these calculators comes with it's own story. Quite a few of them were bought by me brand new or at clearance sales. Some are bought second hand or received as gifts on various occasions and still some were traded for other calculators. If you are prepared to make a deal, drop me a line.

Calculators on the picture ordered by manufacturing date

Some late additions are missing on the picture

The wish list

The mission

Why?

This is what really got me interested in computing back in 1973, or was it 1974? This was really pre everything in microprocessors. I think Intel had the 4004 and 8008, but there was not an operating system in sight and there was definitely no languages. Did you say application? Don't bother. At these days the average computer addict called some LEDs flashing a major break-through.

Links to sources of information

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This page was last updated 1999-12-01.